BANKING TRADE AND COMMERCE

REGULATED MARKETS

Marketing of agricultural produce was fraught with frequent malpractices and irregularities which were not conducive to the interests of the agriculturists in the past. As the peasant was ignorant and economically handicapped the traders used to exploit him. Realising the ill effects of the unfair practices on marketing the Royal Commission on Agriculture (1927) recommended to the government, the necessity of regulating this business. Accordingly, the Government of Bombay enacted the Bombay Cotton Markets Act in 1927. Subsequently the Bombay Principal Banking Enquiry Committee (1931) also stressed the need for protection to the agricultural community in the disposal of marketable surplus by establishing a chain of regulated markets. The Bombay Cotton Markets Act which regulated only cotton trade was replaced by a more broad based Act, viz. the Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act in 1939. This Act brought the sale and purchase of a number of commodities under the purview of the enactment.

The principal objectives of this Act are, (1) to bring about equity in bargaining power among the agriculturists and traders, (2) to promote mutual confidence, (3) to prevent malpractices and (4) to give a fair deal to the peasants.

The Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act purports to regulate market practices. The price of agricultural commodities brought into the market is settled by open auction or open agreement. Variations in this rule are not allowed. The produce is arranged in heaps or bullock carts near the adat shops of the various general commission agents who are licensed by the market committee. The general commission agents or adatyas, as they are called, serve as intermediaries between the agriculturists and traders. They are entitled to get commission at certain rates stipulated by the market committee. The prospective purchasers inspect the produce before bidding. As soon as the bargain is settled the adatya prepares an agreement paper giving the agreed price. The officials of the market committee supervise all these operations. After the sale is effected the buyer takes the delivery of the produce on the market yard and pays the value of the goods to the agriculturist or his general commission agents on the same day. Weighing of the produce is done by the licensed weighmen on the market yard itself. Weighing of cotton and chillis is allowed to take place outside the market premises. The weighing equipment is provided by the adatyas. Coolies (hamals) on the market yard are licensed by the market committee.

Cattle, sheep and goats are sold by open agreement system. This system does not differ much in content from the system of open auction.

The Act has clearly defined the market charges deductible from the sale proceeds. The authorities of the market committee do not allow the traders to deduct unauthorised market charges, such as, dharmadaya, goshala, kasar, sut and temple charges. The recognised charges include market cess, adat commission, weighing and hamuli. This has in consequence reduced the burden on the agricultural sellers.

The market authorities encourage the agricultural sellers to bring the produce to the market yard in pure condition. This assures better price for better produce.

The entire modus operandi of marketing is closely watched by the officials of the market committee. The code of business conduct is set and disputes are solved by arbitration. The market functionaries, viz.. general commission agents, weighmen and hamals are under the control of the market committee.

Under the provisions of the Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act. the market committees comprise selected representatives of agriculturists and of traders as well as nominated members from government and local bodies. They are under the overall control, of the Director of Agricultural Marketing and Joint Registrar of Cooperative Societies, Maharashtra State, Poona. The Co-operation and Industries Officer of the Zilla Parishad looks after the working of the market committees in the district, and guides them in respect of their day to day affairs.

Another feature of considerable signicance in regard to the market committees is the facility of dissemination of information about prices and market news. The daily prices and arrivals are displayed on the notice board after the sales are completed. The price trends prevailing at important markets in the district as well as outside are announced for information of the agriculturists before the auctions take place. Market news relayed from the Akashwani are made available through radio sets at the market yard.

It may be noted that the entire Dhulia district has been brought under the purview of the Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act of 1939 and its subsequent amendment in 1961. The following market committees are functioning in the district.

Agricultural Produce Market Committee

Area of Operation

Principal Market Yard

Sub-Market Yard

Temporary Sub-Market Yard.

1

2

3

4

5

1. Dhulia

Dhulia taluka

Dhulia

 Shirud

 --

2. Dondaicha

Sindkhcda taluka

Dondiacha

(1) Sindkheda.

--

(2) Nardana.

--

(3) Betawad.

--

3. Shirpur

Shirpur taluka

Shirpur

(1) Holnanthe.

--

(2) Vikharan. Dhanort

--

4. Nandurbar

Nandurbar taluka

Nandurbar

--

5. Shuhada

Shahada and Akranitalukas

Shahada.

(1) Prakashe

Sarangkheda.

 

(2) Mandana.

6. Nawapur

Nawapur taluka

Nawapur

(1) Chinchpada

Dhunarat:

 

(2) Khandbara.

(3) Visarwadi. Akkalkuwa

7. Taloda

Taloda and Akkal kuwa talukas.

Taloda

(1) Sorapada,

(2) Khapar,

(3) Taloda (village)

8. Sakri

Sakri taluka

Sakri

--

--

Besides, it is proposed to establish sub-market yards at Dhadgaon, Ranale, Wanyavihir, Borad, Lamkani, Mhasawad, Vadali, Pimpalner and Nizampur. The necessary survey reports and proposals are being forwarded to the concerned authorities. Thus the network of regulated markets in the district will be complete.

Dhulia.

 Dhulia is one of the oldest regulated markets in the State. It was established in September 1930 under the terms of the Bombay Cotton Markets Act of 1927. Subsequently provisions of the Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act of 1939 were made applicable to Dhulia market and a number of other agricultural commodities were brought under regulation.

The commodities regulated at Dhulia [Cotton was the only commodity regulated upto 1942,] comprise cotton (ginned as well as unginned), groundnut, jowar, wheat, bajri, udid, math, mug, chola, sesamum, gram, chillis (wet and dry), mangoes, onions, gul, sheep and goats.

The number of licensed dealers and market functionaries in the year 1962-63 is given below:—

(1) General Commission Agents

51

(2) Class A traders

148

(3) Class A cattle traders

21

(4) Cattle brokers

9

(5) Weighmen

70

(6) Warehouseman

1

Besides the principal market yard at Dhulia, there is a sub-market yard at Shirud. The total turnover of trade at Dhulia market was of the order of Rs. 5,70,40.218 and at Shirud Rs. 16,08"035 in 1963-64. The turnover of trade in 1962-63 was Rs. 4,51,65,659 at Dhulia and Rs. 13,93,276 at Shirud.

Cotton and groundnut are the most important commodities traded at Dhulia.

The following table gives the statistics of turnover of trade at Dhulia:

TABLE No. 26

STATISTICS OF TURNOVER OF TRADE AT DHULIA MARKET DURING 1958-59 TO 1963-64

Commodity

1958-59

1961-62

Turnover Bengali Mds.

Value Rs.

Turnover Quintals

Value Rs.

1.

Cotton

1,75,330

54,87,992.12

1,57,329

1.71,64,221

2.

Groundnut

7,66,000

1,28,30,412.43

1,92.473

1,22,12,781

3.

Udid

9,742

1,63,317.85

3,225

1,97,014

4.

Math

12,709

1,93,838.75

3,320

1,44,002

5.

Mug

10,870

2,01,581.55

2,849

1,28,207

6.

Chavali

7,270

1,32,493.80

4,915

3,24,488

7.

Sesamum

17,196

5,65,692.32

5,033

5,19,653

8.

Gram

5,166

99,006.99

10,927

4,31,947

9.

Wheat

86,452

21,92,835 68

40,432

20.97,615

10.

Jowar

54,175

6,78,274 53

72,346

28,88,437

11.

Bajri

37,331

5,71,631.24

21,788

10,44,813

12.

Gul

49,250

10,16,346.56

31,765

16,02,635

13.

Chilli (wet)

17,611

3,00,003.75

7,303

2,73,216

14.

Chilli (dry)

3,468

2.88,075.63

1.950

3,25,777

 

Total

12,52,570

2.47,21.503.20

5.55,655

3,93,54,806

contd.

Commodity

1962-63

1963-64

Turnover Quintals

Value Rs.

Turnover Quintals

Value Rs.

1.

Cotton

1,84,030

2,15,51,857

2,00,175

2,75,25,194

2.

Groundnut

2,29,218

1,32,08,454

2,05,614

1,43,31,415

3.

Udid

2,628

1,74,161

2,832

1,75,032

4.

Math

2,382

87.525

1,935

92,989

5.

Mug

2,784

1,45,466

1,998

1,35,856

6.

Chavali

2,772

2,89,229

2,566

2,32,365

7.

Sesamum

10,122

10,03,740

8,388

9,78,384

8.

Gram

8,082

3,52,686

6,150

1,82,916

9.

Wheat

40,758

18,25.740

58,598

46,60,259

10.

Jowar

42,516

13.95,334

28,752

12,33,796

11.

Bajri

28,767

12,89,649

31,746

15,38,755

12.

Gul

29,238

22,34,109

44,802

44,37,851

13.

Chilli (wet)

12,504

5,74,614

13,326

6,65,623

14.

Chilli (dry)

2,825

6,84,698

2,715

4.68,93

 

Total

5,98,626

4,48,17,262

609,597

5,66,59,368

The following statement gives the statistics of turnover of trade in cotton and groundnut at Dhulia market during the period from 1943 to 1953:

Year

Cotton Number of carts

Value Rs.

Groundnut Number of carts

Value Rs.

1943-44

28,490

N.A.

49,459

N.A.

1944-45

13,728

N.A.

49,220

N.A.

1945-46

14,685

N.A.

53,350

N.A.

1946-47

15,299

N.A.

56,559

N.A.

1947-48

9,095

N.A.

69,504

N.A.

1948-49

9,691

44,32,723

73,251

2,14,25,917

1949-50

10,761

53,97,061

68,874

2,09,52,762

1950-51

13,481

69,53,668

56,586

2,05,16,845

1951-52

14,296

55,32,887

47,440

1,27,64,325

1952-53

12,858

45,42,640

25,382

43,34,076

All the commodities are sold by open auction. This assures fair prices for the commodities of good quality. Weighment of cotton is done at the premises of the purchaser, whereas that of all other commodities is done on the market itself. The metric units of weights are used.

After the price is determined an agreement, called Kabulayat, is made. The kabulayat is countersigned by an official of the market committee.

The Dhulia market is well furnished with various facilities to the agricultural sellers as well as purchasers. The market yard is very spacious, and is furnished with electric lights, wells, water taps, water cooler, weighing sheds, raised platforms and good roads. The Maharashtra State Warehousing Corporation has constructed warehouses for the benefit of the sellers as well as purchasers. Another warehouse has been proposed by the District Sale and Purchase Union, There is a branch of the Dhulia District Central Co-operative Bank which facilitates banking transactions at the market yard.

Two co-operative marketing institutions are functioning as general commission agents in this market.

Dondaicha

Dondaicha is another important agricultural market in the district. . The predecessor of the present agricultural produce market which was then termed as the 'cotton market' was established in 1939 under the Bombay Cotton Markets Act of 1927. Subsequently, however, it was brought under the purview of the Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act of 1939. As such, other agricultural produce was also brought under regulation. The commodities regulated at present comprise cotton, groundnut, chilli (dry as well as wet), jowar, bajra, wheat, math, mug, chavali, udid, sesamum, castor seed, gram, tur, gul, and cattle.

Under the jurisdiction of the market committee there is a principal market yard at Dondaicha, and sub-market yards at Nardhana, Sindkheda and Betawad. The official market area of each yard extends over a radius of five miles (eight kilometres) around the respective yards.

The number of licensed dealers and market functionaries in 1961-62 is given below:—

Category

Dondaicha

Nardhana

Sindkheda

Betawad

General Commission Agents

47

3

5

--

Class A traders

134

29

25

22

Class B traders

8

9

10

1

Retail traders

82

93

53

43

Weighmen

49

17

16

3

Warehouseman

1

--

--

--

The value of turnover of trade was Rs. 3,09,96,297 at Dondaicha, Rs. 80,65,068 at Nardhana, Rs. 29,95,765 at Sindkheda and Rs. 89,282 at Betawad market in 1963-64.

Groundnut and chilli are the most important commodities of trade at Dondaicha. The turnover of the trade in groundnut, cotton and chilli during 1948-1953 is given in the following statement.

Arrivals of important Commodities at Dondaicha market*

(Figures in number of carts)

Year

Groundnut

Cotton

Chilli

Wet

Dry

1948-49

45,996

1,485

N.A.

N.A.

1949-50

51,521

685

N.A.

N.A.

1950-51

40,151

1,742

6,408

161

1951-52

21,239

2,153

9,692

376

1952-53

9,939

3,227

6,005

473

* Annual Administration Report, A. P. F. C, Dondaicha, 1952-53.

The total turnover of trade and value thereof during 1962-63 and 1963-64 is given in the following table:—

TABLE No. 27

VOLUME OF TRADE AT DONDAICHA MARKET COMMITTEE DURING 1962-63

AND 1963-64

(Figures of turnover in quantals)

Commodity

1962-63

1963-64

Turnover

Value

Turnover

Value

 

 

Rs.

 

Rs.

Cotton

64,242

67,40,018

56,988

68,58,019

Groundnut (ashelled)

1,40,376

79,01,635

1,44,630

28,22,813

Groundnut (shelled)

312

29.712

486

54,180

Chillis (wet)

1,19,658

71,84,177

1,22,124

80,30,004

Chillis (dry)

648

94,653

942

56,009

Math

896

30,837

1,512

66,895

Mug

16,892

7,90,261

48,624

25,16,622

Chela

784

56,503

2,616

1,88,617

Udid

12,780

7,40,100

15,558

7,54,495

Gram

11,854

2,38,976

5,220

1,51.625

Sesamum

8,035

7,87,160

13,007

12,07,409

Linseed

297

16,896

384

28,592

Castor seed

978

50,309

825

48.287

Tur

4,206

1,84.100

3.366

1,97,505

Gul

18.360

2,61,191

18.270

1 7,67,576

Wheat

23,892

10,70,923

34,743

25.29.734

Jowar

80,208

29,65,428

84,413

34,01,628

Bajri

7,890

3,12,996

7,110

3,16,287

The Dondaicha market yard is spacious, and provides the necessary facilities to the agriculturists and traders. A warehouse of the Maharashtra State Warehousing Corporation is situated in the premises of the yard.

Transport of merchandise is facilitated by the Bhusawal-Surat railway line. There are also good motorable roads connecting Dondaicha market with Dhulia, Nandurbar and Surat.

Nandurbar.

The Nandurbar market was brought under the purview of the Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act in 1948 when trade in cotton, groundnut, tur, gram and castor seed was regulated. The business in mug, udid, math, chavali, sesamum, alashi, khurasani, ambadi, chilli and gul was brought under regulation in 1950, that of wheat, jowar and bajri in 1954, and that of rai, fenugreek, kulthi, ajwan, shepa, and cattle in 1955. The market yard is spacious and is equipped with the necessary facilities.

The market functionaries licensed by the market authorities comprise general commission agents (46  [Number in 1962-63.] ), purchasers (197), cattle purchasers (11), cattle dalals (6), weighmen (45), warehouseman (1) and assistants (163). The market committee derived an income of Rs. 27,091 by way of licence fees and Rs. 24,738 by way of market fees in 1962-63.

The following table gives the annual arrivals of various commodities in the market:—

TABLE No. 28

 VOLUME AND VALUE OF TRADE AT NANDUHBAR, DURING 1962-63

Commodities

No. of carts

Volume

Value

  

(Quintals)

(Rs.)

Cotton

7,845

36,317

43,85,820

Groundnut seed

56

134

12,571

Groundnut

32,853

1,80,804

1,04,83,352

Chillis (wet)

17,702

83,118

5,15,120

Chillis (dry)

5,211

20,440

31,71,358

Gul

2,068

11,425

7,23,009

Tur

6,316

34,293

16,05,826

Gram

1,191

4,737

2,04,829

Castor seed

310

1,449

81,016

Mug

1,961

9,256

5,07,439

Udid

4,163

36,161

2,44,13,65

Math

47

185

6,408

Chavali

113

432

29,715

Sesamum

801

3,179

3,04,992

Safflower

88

271

15,501

Khurasani

270

1,304

77,783

Ambadi

221

883

26,891

Wheat

9,528

49,315

26,01,382

Jowar (Dadar)

34,810

1,99,198

71,90,373

Bajri

779

3,643

1,63,973

Rai

21

40

3,755

Fenugreek

14

25

1,325

Kulthi

65

277

9,831

Ajwan

1,044

4,351

3,37,852

Shepa

933

3,765

1,69,968

The regulation of transactions in agricultural produce is beneficial to farmers. Proper supervision and guidance by officials of the market committee have brought lasting gains to the agricultural class. The market is provided with a warehouse of the Maharashtra State Warehousing Corporation, since December 1959.

Shirpur.

The transactions in agricultural produce at Shirpur were regulated in 1948. Consequently trade in groundnut, sesamum, udid, mug, tur, gram and cotton was regulated in 1948. The provisions of regulation were extended to math, chawali, alashi in 1950, to wheat, jowar, bajra and cattle in 1954, to sheep and goats in 1955, and to rice, kulthi, cotton seed, gul, chilli and castor seed in 1961. Thus, almost all the produce has been brought under regulation.

The Shirpur Market Committee has maintained a principal market yard at Shirpur, whereas, there are sub-market yards at Holnanthe and Vikharan. They together cover up the entire Shirpur taluka.

The Shirpur market is provided with the necessary amenities of godowns, warehouses, electric lights, water supply, roads and sanitary blocks.

The following table gives the volume and value of arrivals at the market yard and sub-market yards during 1962-63 and 1963-64:—

TABLE No. 29

ARRIVALS AT SHIRPUR MARKET (FROM 1962-63 TO 1963-64)

Commodity 

1962-63*

1963-641

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

--

(Quintals)

(Rs.)

(Quintals)

(Rs.)

Groundnut

56,747

34,04,834

93,275

70,07,550

Cotton

54,485

59,89,103

79,510

9,93,875

Sesame

7,016

40,707

8,182

9,00,020

Udid

1,963

1,00,723

2,773

1,52,110

Mug

27,699

12,86,908

30,110

22,58,250

Tur

236

10,047

440

24,200

Gram

1,501

90,017

3,703

2,03,665

Math

349

34,900

312

18,720

Chawali (chola)

249

10,035

469

35,175

Alashi (Linseed)

177

8,850

253

17,710

Jowar

35,213

14,19,063

63,953

36,17,415

Wheat

5,365

2,68,257

9,970

8,97,300

Bajari

1,577

78,628

3,904

2,39,040

Chilli (wet)

4,478

1,79,158

4,795

2,39,750

Chilli (dry)

1,243

76,300

168

30,240

Gul

2,933

1,48,280

4,929

3,94,320

Rai

2,105

1,51,250

3,055

3,05,503

Castor-seed

102

4,080

114

7,410

Kulthi

119

7,140

136

3,800

Total

2,03,558

1,39,69,973

3,09,521

2,61,93,925

*Annual Report, A.P.M.C, Shirpur, 1962-63.

1 Report from the Zilla Parishad, 1963-64.

The income of the market committee amounted to Rs. 66,204 and expenditure to Rs. 55,246 in 1963-64, thus leaving a surplus of Rs. 10,958

Shahada.

The Shahada market committee was established in 1949. The area of operation of the market committee extends over Shahada and Akrani talukas. Besides the principal market yard at Shahada, there are sub-market yards at Prakashe and Mandana. The commodities brought under regulation comprise cotton, groundnut, tur, mug, udid, gram, sesamum, chola, kulthi, math, jowar, bajari, wheat, methi, gul, chilli, paddy, as also cattle., sheep and goats.

The total turnover of trade at Shahada market was 1,37,332 quintals valued at Rs. 99,39,715 in 1963-64. The following table

gives the volume and value of trade in various commodities at Shahada market during 1962-63 and 1963-64:—

TABLE No. 30

ARRIVALS AT SHAHADA MARKET (1962-63 AND 1963-64)

Commodity

1962-63

1963-64

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Groundnut

(Quintals) 30,528

(Rs.) 17,39,399

(Quintals) 29,542

(Rs.) 24,97,918

Cotton

18,513

21,50,458

19,272

27,17,937

Mug

4.387

2,31,031

9,804

4,47,382

Udid

6,232

4,56,899

7,692

4,45,245

Sesamum

6,763

4,39,430

2,339

2,45,! 36

Tur

2,727

1,34,057

572

3,42,877

Gram

2,635

1,14,943

2,886

1.36,345

Chola

175

1 1,007

286

19,883

Kulthi

26

1,254

42

1,655

Math

8

300

62

2,863

Jowar

46,368

16,15,257

38,024

14,81,022

Bajari

1,77!

67,434

2,288

59,421

Wheat

12,128

5,68,075

12,663

8,95,778

Methi

37

1,629

2

110

Gul

8,065

4,88,585

7,023

6,13,963

Chilli (wet)

114

11,799

--

--

Chilli (dry)

59

9,650

106

14,917

Paddy

9

234

2

82

Rice

136

7,993

102

7,241

The statistics regarding the turnover of trade at the sub-market yards at Prakashe and Mandana are given in the following table:—

TABLE No. 31

ARRIVALS AT PRAKASHE AND MANDANA SUB-MARKETS, 1963-64

Commodity

Prakashe

Mandana

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

 

(Quintals)

(Rs.)

(Quintals)

(Rs.)

Groundnut

6,110

3,56,321

3,016

1,93,190

Cotton

1,233

1,35,957

234

32,445

Mug

916

44,148

499

26,562

Udid

335

19,680

2,726

1,57,415

Sesamum

215

13,897

93

8,522

Tur

1,152

72,257

55

3,245

Gram

541

30,969

7

430

Chola

4

175

39

2,074

Kulthi

18

807

6

350

Math

18

819

4

139

Jowar

8,175

3,47,280

534

i 9,657

Bajari

129

5,781

--

--

Wheat

1,173

72,477

144

6,077

Gul

159

14,161

7

700

Chilli (wet)

107

5,956

--

--

Chilli (dry)

1

135

--

--

Taloda

The Bombay Agricultural Produce Markets Act of 1939 was made applicable to Taloda market in 1961. The area of operation of this market extends over Taloda and Akkalkuwa talukas. The market committee looks after the principal market yard at Taloda and sub-market yard at Akkalkuwa. The commodities regulated at present comprise cotton, groundnut, tur, gram, castor seed, mug, udid, chola, sesamum, linseed, niger seed, ambadi, chilli, gul, wheat, jowar, bajari, kulthi, math, thymol (owa), dill-seed, rai . (mustard), methi (fenugreek), cattle, sheep and goats.

The total turnover of trade in the various commodities during 1982-63 and 1963-64 is given in the following table: -

TABLE No. 32

 ARRIVALS AT TALODA MARKET (1962-63 AND 1963-64)

(Figures of Volume in Quintals)

Commodity

1962-63

1963-64

Volume

Value (Rs.)

Volume

Value (Rs.)

Cotton

6,971

7,67,735

1,598

1,92,754

Groundnut

11,015

7,21,441

24.242

12,67,319

Castor seed

115

6,999

39

2,460

Tur

4,253

1,88,314

11,259

6,58,757

Gram

892

38,257

N.A.

N.A.

Mug

51

2,576

226

9,364

Udid

1,056

76,474

2,663

1,48,000

Chola

26

1,928

173

10,814

Sesamum

81

7,208

354

30,667

Linseed

2

122

6

327

Niger seed

132

7,254

370

22,157

Ambadi

4

128

10

302

Chilli

7

361

26

5,243

Gul

1,798

1,12,373

1,449

1,32,529

Wheat

3,053

1,45,841

4,219

2,70,083

Jowar

22,836

7,15,883

21,605

8.91,610

Bajari

67

2,793

66

2,405

Thymol

325

18,496

335

34,719

Dill-seed

66

2,650

13

533

Sakri.

The Sakri market came under regulation from 1962. The area of operation of the market extends over Sakri taluka. The commodities regulated at present comprise cotton, groundnut, udid, math, chola, chilli, wheat, bajari, jowar, gul, onion, lady's fingers, nagli, and paddy.

The turnover of trade in the principal commodities at Sakri in 1963-64 is given in the following statement:—

(Figures of volume in quintals)

Commodity

Volume

Value

 

(Rs.)

Groundnut

40 178

22,38,259

Cotton

20,857

23,85,991

Bhusar

2,794

2,02,531

Sakri is comparatively a smaller market. A large quantum of agricultural produce from Sakri taluka goes to Dhulia and Nandurbar markets for sale. The traditional commercial ties of the agriculturists with the traders at Dhulia and Nandurbar encourage considerable volume of trade to flee away to those centres.

Nawapur.

The Nawapur market was regulated in 1950, and as such transactions in cotton, tur, udid, gram, castor seed, khursani and sesamum were brought under the purview of the Act. Trade in wheat, jowar (dadar), groundnut and ambadi was regulated subsequently in 1954. Besides the principal market at Nawapur, the market committee has established sub-market yards at (1) Khandbara, (2) Chinchpada, (3) Visarwadi and (4) Dhanrat. The entire Nawapur taluka is thus brought under regulation.

All the market functionaries are licensed by the market committee. In 1961-62, there were 104 wholesale purchasers, 219 retail purchasers, 8 general commission agents, 12 weighmen and 148 assistants. The market authorities derived an income of Rs. 17,909 by way of licence fee from them in 1961-62.

The total arrivals at the market amounted to 22,251 carts valued at Rs. 65,35,315 in 1961-62. Of the total value of turnover, cotton accounted for Rs. 29,36,165. The following statement gives the annual arrivals of various commodities at the market between 1950-51 and 1955-56:—

NUMBER OF CARTS ARRIVED AT NAWAPUR MARKET*

Commodity

1950-51

1951-52

1952-53

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

Cotton

7,563

6,795

6,719

8,079

11,892

1 3,270

Tur

2,114

2,774

3,673

4,307

6,661

7,592

Castorseed

1,381

1,350

1,801

1,756

395

861

Gram

1,254

769

407

442

307

622

Udid

536

92

341

1,132

1,209

750

Sesamum

222

258

659

389

293

22

Groundnut

--

--

--

89

2,455

1,426

Jowar (Dadar)

--

--

--

862

2,684

1,992

*Annual Administration Report, A.P.M.C., Nawapur, 1955-56.

The following table gives the turnover of trade at Nawapur market during the period 1960-61 to 1963-64:-

TABLE No. 33

ARRIVALS AT NAWAPUR MARKET (1960-61 to 1963-64)

(Figures of volume in quintals and value in Rs.)

Commodity

1960-61

1961-62

Volume

Value,.

Volume

Value

Cotton

38,486

39,39,427

23,753

29,36,165

Tur

31,242

12,78,613

37,995

13,02,519

Gram

429

19,798

804

39,357

Castor seed

1,923

66,117

710

46,038

Udid

9,588

3,84,277

10,285

5,38,918

Sesamum

94

9,636

15

1,369

Niger seed

270

19,069

594

41,362

Groundnut

8,597

5,17,372

8,872

6,40,342

Ambadi

513

13,494

404

11,395

Wheat

833

26,709

1,575

78,183

Jowar

9,583

3,32,947

13,758

4,99,667

contd.

Commodity

1962-63

1963-64

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Cotton

44,139

53,18,600

28,578

38,09,090

Tur

16,567

8,55,546

34,202

23,04,675

Gram

549

24,615

836

52,059

Castor seed

605

35,413

977

63,516

Udid

1,099

63,329

5,006

2,61,691

Sesamum

165

14,546

139

12,977

Niger seed

288

17,216

218

14,921

Groundnut

5,818

3,40,706

10,271

6,39,273

Ambadi

527

14,854

487

15,643

Wheat

1,752

86,813

1,478

99,271

Jowar

25,219

8,34,838

35,661

14,36,870

Regulation of agricultural marketing in Nawapur taluka has been difficult due to the backwardness and illiteracy among the adivasi population. The adivasis find it difficult to free themselves from the clutches of the money-lenders. They agree to sell their produce well in advance before the harvesting season at very low price. In order to meet debt obligations, they sell the produce at any price to the money-lenders. Thus, a considerable volume of business escapes the supervision of the market authorities. However, these conditions are sure to improve with better understanding of the principles of regulated markets and the advantages therefrom by the local populace.

 

TOP